Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cleaning Services Gainesville, FL | Business & Home
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Coronavirus (Covid-19) Disinfecting Services

Coronavirus (COVID-19): We’re Here For You, Your Home and Your Business!

Commercial and Residential Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cleaning Services in Gainesville, FL.


Allclean Inc. is an expert level cleaning company ready to help disinfect your home or professional space in the greater Gainesville area. We have done the research and training to properly clean your building or home, taking extra precautions to properly sanitize all high touch areas, as well as shared living or working spaces. We are operating under all CDC guidelines and using only hospital grade, CDC approved products. We have invested in an electrostatic sprayer as well to utilize on the appropriate surfaces. Some of the most common areas we disinfect include:

  • Tables, desks
  • Door knobs, handles
  • Light switches
  • Phones, keyboards
  • Toilets, faucets, sinks
Commercial & Residential Coronavirus (Covid-19) Cleaning Services in Gainesville, FL.
Commercial & Residential Coronavirus (Covid-19) Cleaning Services in Gainesville, FL.

Some of The Most Common Questions Asked and Answered by CDC Regarding Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Please visit CDC’s official website links below as these recommendations will be updated if additional information becomes available.

How often should I clean surfaces during COVID-19?

How often should I clean surfaces during COVID-19?


Routine cleaning and disinfecting are an important part of reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19. Normal routine cleaning with soap and water alone can reduce risk of exposure and is a necessary step before you disinfect dirty surfaces.

Surfaces frequently touched by multiple people, such as door handles, desks, phones, light switches, and faucets, should be cleaned and disinfected at least daily. More frequent cleaning and disinfection may be required based on level of use. For example, certain surfaces and objects in public spaces, such as shopping carts and point of sale keypads, should be cleaned and disinfected before each use.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus Reopen Guidance

How frequently should facilities be cleaned to reduce the potential spread of the coronavirus disease?

How frequently should facilities be cleaned to reduce the potential spread of the coronavirus disease?


Routine cleaning is the everyday cleaning practices that businesses and communities normally use to maintain a healthy environment. Surfaces frequently touched by multiple people, such as door handles, bathroom surfaces, and handrails, should be cleaned with soap and water or another detergent at least daily when facilities are in use. More frequent cleaning and disinfection may be required based on level of use. For example, certain surfaces and objects in public spaces, such as shopping carts and point of sale keypads, should be cleaned and disinfected before each use. Cleaning removes dirt and impurities, including germs, from surfaces. Cleaning alone does not kill germs, but it reduces the number of germs on a surface.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus Routine Cleaning

Is cleaning alone effective against the coronavirus disease?

Is cleaning alone effective against the coronavirus disease?


Cleaning does not kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection. If a surface may have gotten the virus on it from a person with or suspected to have COVID-19, the surface should be cleaned and disinfected. Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus And Killing Germs

What surfaces should be disinfected during the coronavirus disease pandemic?

What surfaces should be disinfected during the coronavirus disease pandemic?


Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces. More frequent cleaning and disinfection may be required based on level of use. Surfaces and objects in public places, such as shopping carts and point of sale keypads should be cleaned and disinfected before each use.
High touch surfaces include: tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus on Disinfecting Buildings

Do I need to disinfect my workplaces if it has been unoccupied for 7 days?

Do I need to disinfect my workplaces if it has been unoccupied for 7 days?


If your workplace, school, or business has been unoccupied for 7 days or more, it will only need your normal routine cleaning to reopen the area. This is because the virus that causes COVID-19 has not been shown to survive on surfaces longer than this time.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus Disinfecting School, Business, Water Systems

Can you contract the coronavirus disease from a package in the mail?

Can you contract the coronavirus disease from a package in the mail?


Coronaviruses are thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Although the virus can survive for a short period on some surfaces, it is unlikely to be spread from domestic or international mail, products or packaging.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus Spreading Through Mail

Is bleach an effective cleaning agent for the coronavirus disease?

Is bleach an effective cleaning agent for the coronavirus disease?


Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted. Prepare a bleach solution by mixing 5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) bleach per gallon of water.

Visit CDC To Learn More About Coronavirus And Bleach Solution

How long does the coronavirus disease stay on surfaces?

How long does the coronavirus disease stay on surfaces?


It remained infectious for up to 24 hours on cardboard and four hours on copper. The virus was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours. These times will vary under real-world conditions, depending on factors including temperature, humidity, ventilation, and the amount of virus deposited.

Visit NIH.gov To Learn More About Coronavirus Duration Stay on a Surface

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